Day 13, July 31st – beginning of the horse trek!

This morning was a bit of a disaster. We have worked out a rota where different groups clean and wash up on different days. My tent group were cooking for today, but we were late getting up, late starting the fire, late cooking breakfast, and just generally late. As a result we had to make the wranglers wait more than half an hour before we saddled up and set off.

The rest of the day was gratifying. I am quite fond of my definitively male horse, a grey, spotted creature. I call him Aloysius. He is an animal who seems to know very much what he wants and is determined to get it – he wants to stop dead in the middle of a track to get a mouthful of grass, he does so, unless I yank his head back up again right quick.

I’ve mastered the art of steering him, and have at least worked out how to make him start and stop, but quickening the pace still remains somewhat beyond me. There are only so many times you can say ‘chu’, the sound for encouraging the horse to move faster, before feeling like a hyperactive steam train, but that is how you have to act when you have other horses and riders breathing up your back – literally.

At least Aloysius is fairly well behaved, and doesn’t try to buck my off – like Georgie’s horse, or kick everybody in sight, like Ellie’s, or just be generally skittish like Emma and Amit’s. They all had to be led along by wranglers, to prevent the horses from bolting. Amit in particular is very annoyed, especially since his white horse is so sweet looking and deceptively cute.

Aloysius is very friendly with Kaz’s horse, an Eeyore-lookalike who I called Applejuice, until I learned Kaz had name it Attitude.

We travelled around the edge of the lake for many miles, travelling along the beach and through some tiny streams, until we reached the first campsite.

The place we are staying in for the night is very pleasant, with hot sunshine, though we have to walk up a nearby hill to get dead wood from the trees, around the hill to get to the freshly dug latrine – complete with a privacy screen rigged up from two spare canvas bags and my walking poles – and about half a kilometre to the shore of the lake to get water, sponge bathe or swim. When we iodize the water to drink, we have to sieve off all the detritus from the water – sand, occasional weeds and dead water insects and water fleas Yum.

The wranglers are all very friendly, and they are going to provide two meals for us during the trek – which while consist of killing sheep we purchase and cooking them in a Mongolian style barbecue. I can’t wait – we are getting better at cooking but we are getting tired of scrambled eggs, cucumber sandwiches and pasta.

Today, Will decided on a new way of draining the water out of the rice pot; by putting the lid on and letting the water out of the hole required for steam. The water was drained but since the metal of the lid had expanded, we now couldn’t get the lid off, since it had lost the handle some time ago. We battled with the lid, growing increasingly hungry and terrified of breaking it and getting glass into our rice, plus the fact that the pot was still incredibly hot and heavy. Finally, we managed to lever it off with forks, and no breakages!

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