So. Hannibal 1×11 ‘Rôti’

For the past few weeks, I have had a deep desire to take a leaf out of the book of those who review Tim Burton’s works, and play Hannibal Bingo. Alas, I am somewhat fuzzy on the rules of the game, and do not have the time or the inclination to create special cards suited for the purpose.

Maybe next week.

(I actually do a sort of Bingo throughout the recap, checking various running themes as I saw them, mostly for a joke – what running themes can you find in this episode to call Bingo on? – but one thing I’m not joking about is the unnecessary use of full names. If you’ve read these things you’ll know I have a peeve about the characters using full names when everyone. Knows. Who. They. Are. Talking about.

So, as i went through, I got into the habit of counting  all the times they did it in this episode. I probably haven’t even got them all because I don’t want to drive myself barmy, but, come on. They do it at least seventeen times in this episode. They use full names for no specific reason at least seventeen times. And four of those times are in the last scene, and are all said by the same person. There is no need for this!)

I can easily point to the opening scene of this episode and go “Hah!”, since ‘Rôti’ begins with yet another dinner at Lecter’s house, wherein Lecter serves Dr Frederick Chilton lamb curry with rice on a banana leaf. While Lecter has no interest in sheep, aside from eating them, he can assure Chilton this dish is definitely, hand on heart, no lie, made from sheep. Also, coconut milk.

Capture curry
(Tick of the imaginary box for ‘inflicting cannibalism on my guests for shits and giggles’.)
Also: BANANA LEAF.

The reason Lecter is entertaining Chilton again, despite his obvious distaste for the man last time around, is because Abel Gideon is suing Chilton for manipulating him into thinking he was the Chesapeake Ripper (Not Tick, because they are establishing things.)  Naturally, Chilton comes to Lecter for advice, rather than a lawyer, because the petty manipulator seeking advice from the guy who eats people, and has himself manipulated a patient, is both amusingly ironic and makes the audience shake their heads in exasperation. The parallel between the two men could not be more obvious as Lecter advises Chilton to ‘deny everything’, and further advises that he was trying too hard; in order for this sort of treatment to work, the patient must not be aware of any influence.

Oh, Hannibal, you do have such a way of making me love and hate you at the same time.

(Tick.)

Will wakes from dreams of water – a return to the beach where the Human Totem Pole was found, then a shot of stock footage of a glacier cracking and more stock footage of a tidal wave, sorry to break the flow but the sky is clearly blue, as opposed to the grey of Will’s dream.  He wakes up, only to see his alarm clock start to melt, never a good sign, he clearly sweated a lot during the night, he’s so hot he’s steaming, it’s only a matter of time before he himself turns to water and melts away. Which he does.

Then he wakes up again, soaked in sweat.

(Tick.)

(However, there is no Dire stag. So no tick there.

Yet.)

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So. Hannibal 1×06: ‘Entrée’

Well.

If there were any doubts left about the true nature of this version of Hannibal Lecter, the ending of ‘Entrée’ cleared them up very nicely, as Lecter chokes our poor Clarice Starling substitute into unconsciousness. No doubt with something terrible in mind for her.

Except that Miriam Lass (who never appears in the present, only in Crawford and Lecter’s flashbacks, creating a lasting impression on both of them for both the right and the wrong reasons) is far from a Starling substitute, even if this episode is rife with shout outs to The Silence of the Lambs,* and definitely doesn’t deserve that title. She’s a force in her own right, clever and insightful – and apparently related to a character from another of Bryan Fuller’s shows, Dead Like Me – and dedicated enough to bring about her own downfall at Lecter’s hands. Anna Chlumsky did wonders with what she was given to work with. The few scenes that she had left me really wanting to see more of her, so it was heartbreaking to watch as, unlike Graham, she isn’t nearly as lucky in escaping Lecter’s office alive. Heartbreaking but hardly surprising, as she’s been considered dead a long time  before the episode began, and doubly dead by the end of it.

Or is she? As others have already pointed out, Lecter merely caused her to pass out, and the frantic calls she makes to Crawford had to have been recorded at some point. Perhaps we shouldn’t give up on Miriam Lass just yet.

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