Ben Aaronovitch: Broken Homes

Capture Broken homes

A mutilated body in Crawley. Another killer on the loose. The prime suspect is one Robert Weil; an associate of the twisted magician known as the Faceless Man? Or just a common or garden serial killer?

Before PC Peter Grant can get his head round the case a town planner going under a tube train and a stolen grimoire are adding to his case-load.

So far so London.

But then Peter gets word of something very odd happening in Elephant and Castle, on an housing estate designed by a nutter, built by charlatans and inhabited by the truly desperate.

Is there a connection?

And if there is, why oh why did it have to be South of the River?

Full of warmth, sly humour and a rich cornucopia of things you never knew about London, Aaronovitch’s series has swiftly added Grant’s magical London to Rebus’ Edinburgh and Morse’s Oxford as a destination of choice for those who love their crime with something a little extra.

London’s rivers are full of gods – or rather genius loci. There are Fair Folk living in the Underground System and ghosts haunting the streets who can definitely pack a punch. There are real cat girls – and worse things – in Soho, and vampires in Purley.

(Incidentally, that last section of blurb on the dust jacket of the first book was what inspired me to take it to the counter. I mean, vampires in my home suburb? HOT DAMN.)

Continue reading “Ben Aaronovitch: Broken Homes”

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So. My third day at the London Book Fair, 2013.

Not much to say about today, at least when it came to the fair. I only stayed a little while this time, two hours at the most, walking around the stalls and booths and making notes to follow up. Also covertly watching the big rights meetings at many tables spread out across wide areas, and getting very excited to see posters for books I’ve waited avidly for – such as Ben Aaronovitch’s ‘Broken Homes’, and Neil Gaiman’s ‘The Ocean at the end of the Lane.’ I was very much hoping that they might have some books up for offer, but nope. Sigh.

However, I can put it on record that I actually – gasp! – talked to people.¬†Of my own accord, and for more than a few seconds! I’m really too old to still be having this mental block when it comes to social matters, but damn it was satisfying, even if there was also a lot of terror sweat involved. Once you get going, it can be okay.

And everyone was so nice! That’s what was most important for me to take from this experience; the fair was filled with people taking part in a trade they’re passionate about and want to help other people get into – admittedly for good business reasons, but also to serve the book in all its different forms.

I really enjoyed these three days; I’ve learned a lot about possible career options, I’ve met some interesting people and found some options I might not have considered, and I walked around a lot with my mouth open without looking too much of an idiot, I hope.

Then I treated myself and went to Waterstones, an experience which shall be elaborated upon in another post.